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Taste Your Foods On Lickable Television Screens

The lickable television screen invention will enable taste to be saved as data, and people can sign on with subscriptions as they do for videos and music.

Taste Your Foods On Lickable Television Screens

Over the past few years, watching TV cooking shows has become a fad. However, viewers are left guessing as to what the dishes taste like. A new invention by a Japanese professor is set to change that with a lickable television screens and the device called Taste the TV. 

This invention was unveiled back in October of last year at the Meiji University by Professor Homei Miyashita. His invention makes use of 10 cartridges to create taste samples of food that can thereafter be sprayed on a film on the screen or even on consumable food like rice and bread. 

This device relies on data that is collected by sensors that have the ability to quantify the food flavour. It has to date and successfully replicated the taste of dozens of items, including chocolate, pizza, and fruit. For reproduction of flavours, the device uses sodium chloride for mimicking saltiness; for sweetness, it uses sucrose; for acidity, it is citric acid; for bitterness, it uses quinine hydrochloride; and for umami, it uses sodium glutamate. There are also solutions that fill these cartridges to faithfully reproduce astringent and pungent tastes along with the taste of alcohol. 

According to Miyashita, this invention will enable taste to be saved as data, and people can sign on with subscriptions as they do for videos and music. However, this invention, called Taste the TV, is not ready for launch. It works best with simple flavours but has problems with the replication of complex flavours like curry. Neither can it replicate aroma or food textures. 

Miyashita is planning to add more cartridges and is in close touch with the makers of appliances so that the device can be commercialised. 

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