Connect with us

Hi, what are you looking for?

Tech & Innovation

China Is Targeting Big Tech’s Algorithms As The Crackdown Continues

China to limit the growing power of largest and wealthiest firms, whose platforms now dominate every sector of public conversation and entertainment.

China Is Targeting Big Tech's Algorithms As The Crackdown Continues

China launched a formal effort to curb suspected algorithm misuse by internet firms ranging from ByteDance Ltd. to Tencent Holdings Ltd., focusing on how social media platforms offer out adverts and content to entice users.

The Chinese Cyberspace Administration will undertake on-site inspections of businesses and ask them to submit their different services for examination, according to a statement issued Friday by the internet watchdog. It stated that large-scale websites, platforms, and goods with significant influence will be targeted, but it didn’t mention any names.

The effort is focused at adopting and enforcing rules for the industry’s use of algorithms to display content for consumers, which were announced in August and went into effect last month. It is part of a larger campaign, which began in late 2020, to limit the growing power of China’s largest and wealthiest firms, whose platforms now dominate every sector of public conversation and entertainment.

Since then, the business has been rattled by an onslaught of restrictions that range from online education and gaming to video censorship, prompting a shift in focus from rapid development to core growth. Tencent, Alibaba Group Holding Ltd., Meituan and JD.com Inc. were among the dozen companies that were interviewed by China’s cyber-watchdog to address the 216,800 job cuts that took place between July and mid-March. This is a major concern for Beijing because of the potentially disruptive effect on the broader economy.

The agency emphasised that the enterprises had employed 295,900 individuals within the same time period, resulting in a net gain. Nonetheless, competition for positions in the technology business remains tough, and firms are ready to pay a premium to acquire or retain top-tier talent. Tencent paid more than $200 million to two anonymous executives in 2021, while reducing Pony Ma’s salary for a year in which Beijing’s crackdown caused Tencent’s shares to fall by 19 percent.

Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.